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of problems. we look at the foreign policy agenda when the all-stars join me after the break. i'm phil mic. i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit, even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, haveuts or sores, have had hepatitis b, have been treated for heart failure, or if you have symptoms such as persistent fever, bruising, bleeding, or paleness. [ phil ] get back to the things that matter most. ask your rhe
president is his life experience as a union negotiator was put to work in foreign policy. and what do you do if you're a negotiator you ask for a hundred percent and several for 50. you say the union reserves the right to lie cheat and steal he called it an evil empire before the national association of evangelicals in orlando, you can't make this stuff up. and then in 1985, safely reelected he meets with gorbachev and led to standing in the red square with gorbachev and say there's no longer an evil empire that belonged to another time. a year later the year he left the office ten months after he left washington the berlin wall comes down. so i think michael's exactly right about yes, coming out of the presidency he seemed to be an era of greed and deficits but it's pretty safe to say right now he's remembered for pretty effective foreign policy. >> rose: i wantto focus on foreign policy. so what is the challenge for the president in foreign policy? >> my discussions with him for the first book i did obama's wars and looking exactly how he makes decisions, it's very clear he does not like
not talk about the foreign policy, they did not even have a positive economic plan. they said it will be a referendum on an unsatisfactory referendum -- unsatisfactory performance of the incumbent. the stock market was stronger. it was just good enough to drag president obama across the finish line. i think there's plenty to look at. there are plenty of problems. project orca, the get-out-the- vote project. the message is much too limited, too smug, too assumed that people would reject liberal policies because we said they were liberal. the failure to provide a positive reforming conservative agenda. where was the romney health care plan, the positive plan, not just or peeling -- repealing obamacare? i do think scott walker, sam brownback, bob jindal, that is where you alcee conservative principles govern. in washington, a half to boast -- both oppose the obama administration, collaborate, and in the house, they have to figure out what it means to the beat -- to be the majority of one body of congress while the presidency and other house and congress is held by the other party
attack. joining us now, danielle pletka, vice president foreign policy and defense studies, defense policy studies, i should say, at the american enterprise institute. danielle, thanks for being with us. you wrote a column this week in which your first words were it's hard to like john kerry? [laughter] >> well, i worked for ten years up at the senate foreign relations committee when senator kerry wasn't the chairman, he was one of the other members of the committee. he's just not that popular on capitol hill. he hasn't worked well with other members. that was one of the problems he had when he ran for president. he's perceived as being stand offish, as being uninterested in their issues and in being kind of doctrinaire on policy. jon: but bob corker, the new mexico senator -- we're going to be talking to him next hour -- had glowing words for senator kerry in the hearing this morning. >> every senator walks into a hearing with another senator who's been nominated for something thinking there but for the grace of god go i. it's a collegial institution, but the collegiality is about
seconds i want to close it out with you. it seems at times the president left foreign policy to secretary of state hillary clinton. george, do you see him play an extended role in foreign policy or will he late john kerry take the lead. >> i think he will. his speech focused on making sure friends of old enemies. he's focusing on democrac diplomacy. that's something that obama will have to get involved with at that level. i think he will get involved. >> john: one more time, alex, does john kerry have a charisma deficit that the president needs to worry about. >> john kerry has never been known for charisma, but he has been on the stage for a long time and he can hold his own. >> that's why the two of you are always the smartest kids in class. thank you so much for coming on, on this inauguration day. >> thank you. >> john: what would martin luther king jr. be doing if he were alive today? chances are he wouldn't be working for the koch brothers. coming up next. only on current tv. [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just becaus
on the foreign policy side. that's true. that is certainly a different choice for chief of staff when the economy remains issue number one. the fact of the matter is that jacob lew moving from chief of staff over to the treasury department and joe biden are perfectly capable of managing capitol hill and what needs to be done next in terms of bills and the budget and all of that kind of stuff. i think what makes mcdonough choice so interesting is it's a legacy choice. this is a man who has been at the president's side since the president's national career started as a freshman senator. he was there through the election. he has been at the white house all this time. this is a man whose loyalties to the president and who will protect the president, which is really the number one job of chief of staff. i think it's a very interesting choice and someone that the president trusts fully because now the president is putting together what will be these final years of the obama era and this is a man that he trusts to protect the obama era. >> candy, people might not know this. when the president gets that
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
the speech, however, briep, was the absence of foreign policy. and the two really contentious appointments, or at least one is chuck hagel who is going to run the defense department. and the middle east is aflame again and now we're seeing it spread into africa in a way that is very hard to get a fix for what the model is dealing with it. these are failed states. we have tribalism again prevailing in africa and again in the middle east because islamic rage has not been distinguished. command and control of al qaeda they believe has been broken down, but as you saw in algeria in the past several days, this is going to be a continuing problem out there. that will go to the defense department, how it's run, how much money they have to spend, how they reorganized the response of that and secretary kerry would is going to pick up the baton from hillary clinton has to decide what's our relationship with egypt? how run by a muslim brotherhood. >> it's worth remarking on that because four years ago, as we all sat here, none of us expected every assumption you would make about the middle east for d
the republicans on a whole host of issues including republican staple issues like taxes and foreign policy she does better. it's not enough to go into communities they've ignored or tinker with their message. they have to take a hard look at policies they've embraced, like self-deportation for immigration reform. i don't care how you spin that, hispanics are not going to embrace you if you have a policy like that in your party. >> rick: ron? >> i have to tell you i think president obama is going to help republicans out because he's now unveiled a liberal agenda that, since he has been reelected, surprise, surprise and republicans will be able to contrast themselves as a much morecentric party than the president is going, way left and i think on issues like, climate change, on spending, on, you know, creating a culture of dependence on the federal government, we can help to drive a wedge between senate democrats who are in red states up in 2004, we can drive a wedge between them and focus first on getting back the senate before we go after the presidency. >> rick: doug, what about that? this wa
to one another must be equally as well. >> reporter: foreign policy was noticeably absent from his address though he harolded a decade of war, touting a recovering economy and acknowledged the lessons still ahead. >> the commitments we make to each other, these things do not sap our nation. they strengthen us. >> reporter: he gave mitt romney this line. >> they do not make us a nation of tears. ♪ la >> reporter: filling the air what patriotism, kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ the brave there was a poem and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and look
of staff. he has advised the president on foreign policy for nearly a decade, serving as the president of beauty national security advisor. -- deputy national security advisor. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states accompanied by esther jacob lew and mr. denis mcdonough. >> thank you. thank you, everybody. please, everybody, have a seat. good afternoon, everybody. welcome to the announcement of one of the worst kept secrets in washington. as president, i rely on a team of men and women here at the white house every day. i rely on my chief of staff to keep up with them and our entire government. making sure we are moving in the same direction. making sure that my priorities are being carried out in our policies are consistent with the commitments i have made to the american people and we are delivering progress to the american people. i could not be more grateful to jack lew for his amazing service first as our omb, then at the state department, and ultimately as my chief of staff. as he prepares for his confirmation hearings and the challenge of meeting our treasu
. the important foreign-policy issue of benghazi. it was something we were talking about a month ago, but it faded into the background. everybody will be watching tomorrow. it is a big deal to have the secretary of state come in. everyone wants to hear what she has to say about this. she becomes less of a focus because she's leaving, some say. but it will be really important hearing. the group publicans' want a special committee formed to investigate the because the issue, but they did not get that. all we will crb hearings where we get a picture of it from people who were heading the operation. so her parents will be very big tomorrow. guest: more broadly, on national security, we will enter the beginning of confirmation hearings for john kerry as secretary of state, chuck hagel as secretary of defense. consideration of our military strategy, our military spending, how we project american power as we complete a winding down of the war in afghanistan. it is really going to be the end of a post-9/11 period in national security policy, with the policy going for it from there still unsettled. guest:
's pick for secretary of state answered questions for four hours. kerry says that u.s. foreign policy should be defined by helping hand, as well as by military strength. even with iran stopping its nuclear program, kerry said diplomacy is still an option. >> we will do what we must do to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon, and i repeat here today, our policy is not containment. it is prevention. >> the senate foreign relations committee is expected to approve kerry's nomination early next week. the full senate could vote a few days after. >> which means he would take over for hillary clinton some time in early february. according to some analysts, there was no grand vision that he laid out during the four-hour hearing yesterday, but certainly with iran, with syria, with north korea, his plate, as they often are for secretaries of state, it will be more than full here. >> he certainly is a seasoned politician. and hillary clinton testified yesterday and gave her stamp of approval. so he will be confirmed. >> oh, yeah. there's no -- he's going to get it. he had a little schmoo
justice. dr. king was a fierce critic of foreign policy in the vietnam war. in his beyond vietnam speech, which he delivered at the york's riverside church, 1967, a year before the day he was assassinated, dr. king calledll the united states the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. "time" magazine called the speech demagogic slander that sounded like a script for radio hanoi. today, we let you decide. we play an excerpt of dr. king's speech, beyond vietnam. >> after 1954, they watched us conspire to prevent elections which could have surely brought ho chi minh to power over the united vietnam and they realized they had been did -- betrayed again. when we asked why they do not leap to negotiate, these things must be remembered. also it must be clear that the leaders of hanoi considered the presence of american troops in support of the diem regime to have been the initial military breach of the geneva agreements concerning foreign troops. and they remind us that they did not begin to send troops in large numbers and even supplies, and to the south, until american forces had mo
. a lot of foreign policy experience and not a lot of domestic policy experience. how do you read the announcement? >> he has jack lew. he has joe biden to send up for the all-important relationships on capitol hill. i think this was a legacy pick. the president now has as we know an ambitious agenda that he laid out in the inaugural address. the question is, who is going to protect those goals from him? it's someone he has been with ever since his federal public life has started. that's mcdonough. this is somebody he trusts to protect not just himself. not just the staff, but to move that legacy and the obama era sooner or later will come to an end. the president clearly wants to make the major shape now. i think that's why he picked this man he trusts and has known for so long. >> john kerry ends before the senate foreign relations committee and he will be confirmed. i don't think there is any doubt about that. chuck hagel, that could be a little bit more. >> i think they will rough him up and be more lively than the john kerry hearings. in the end, the numbers. once senator sch
what they think about it and all the power vacuums created by our foreign policy lately are not clearly prepared to keep the peace when we get involved in the arab spring. my point to mr. nixon this isn't the nobel gee we think you are pretty swell award it should go to the christian and muslim leaders in nigeria who are working to bridge the police there. political dissidents in cuba and russia. people doing real on-the-groundwork. so lazy to give it to hillary clinton. just lazy. >> garland, what do you think. >> if the republicans had v. spent one/1,000th of the energy benghazi thinkingalling l figuring out whether there was weapons of mass destruction in iraq as opposed to four in benghazi. >> i do want to bring in, i threw this out in the twitter world in the facebook world and we got a huge response. people very opinionated about whether or not this should happen. one of those responses, mike, sanveri if alfred nobel knew how politicized his peace prize had become he would be rolling in his grave the entire panel has become a farce. s is it too politicized, mike? >> it's almost as
it a foreign policy of hope and change. a change, and you let it happen and you hope it works out. you hope the secularists, when in actuality we know who's filled that vacuum it's been al-qaeda, and from libya and syria trying to take down the regime in egypt. in algeria, mali, across the board they're on the roll and this administration refuses to acknowledge it it. >> brian: what's interesting, whether you agree with president bush or not, he had a freedom agenda, would put advisors on the ground or domestic forces and go in there in quick strike operations. what is this president's mission, is it all about drones with hell-fire missiles? >> it seems like, afghanistan we're headed for the exits even sooner than he talked about on the campaign trail. he's got the quote, flexibility for the second term. i think he believes that with drone strikes and special operators he can affect things enough and anybody who's been on the ground knows it's intelligence on the ground, relationships, even if it's not a massive war front bilike iraq or afghanistan, it's events on the ground that affect not
fighter jets to egypt. here is louie gohmert on "fox & friends." this administration's foreign policy. the foreign policy is, what difference does it make? hey, what difference does it make if we give our sworn enemies, people who want to wipe israel and us off the map, so we give them the method to wipe them out? what's the big deal? we're putting ourselves in jeopardy when we're sending jets and tanks to a man who a leader whose only two enemies he he said in the past are israel and the united states are resupplying our enemies with the means to fight us. the founder and president of the amaker islamic forum and philosophy. thanks for being on the show. >> thanks, clayton for having me. >> if you listen to the congressman. he makes it sound as if egypt is our sworn enemy right now. is that the case? and, if so, why are we sending them the numbers i see 16 f-16s and 200 abraham's tanks by the end of the year? >> >> it's pretty horrifying clayton that we are doing. this and goes beyond the weaponry this is about supporting ideology sworn against the united states, against the west, ag
and then we talk about our wonderful foreign policy. >> gretchen: she did talk about the fact that she did believe that the world was a more dangerous place now than ever before. but that was in the second part of the interview. the first part of the interview before the commercial break was talking about the relationship between president obama and mrs. clinton. i want now listen to this and then get your reaction. >> i just want to have a chance of to publicly say thank you 'cause i think hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we have. >> after i ended my campaign, i immediately did everything i could to help the president get elected because despite our hard fought primary, we had such agreement on what needed to be done for our country. >> it made for tough debates. >> it did. >> we could never figure out what we differed on. >> yeah. we worked at that pretty hard. >> i consider hillary a strong friend. >> very warm, close. i think there is a sense of understanding that sometimes doesn't even take words because we have similar views. we have similar experiences t
of their foreign exchange policy for their own self-interests. but no, i don't see this as a long-term shift towards currency management, towards fixed exchange rates. >> okay. jim, i have a question for you, how does the japanese yen fit into all of this? it is in the news all the time because of the bank of japan and everything they are doing to ease monetary policy, stimulate the economy, what are your thoughts on the yen? >> it's a great question. the japanese yen is the exception to almost everything. the u.s. policy is to cheapen the dollar against all major trading partners, taiwan, korea, china, europe and the rest. japan is an exception. number one, they need the help. they need some help. number two, and they have nothing else going for them, lousy demographics, high debt to gdp etc. the other reason is they have now become the buyer of last resort of treasuries. it used to be china's job, but china is reducing its net purchase of treasuries. if you notice, japan is increasing them. the fed is kind of cutting japan a break saying hey we will let you cheapen against the dollar as lo
on two less obvious facets of foreign policy, the earnvinement and his economy and talked about the u.s. putting its own fiscal house in order to be a leader on the world stage. kerry, a long-time clean energy advocate says it is a $6 trillion market worth millions of american jobs and we need to get in the game. >> the solution of climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues. >> he was less committal about whether he would approve the keystone pipeline because it would cross the border between the u.s. and canada. kerry is expected to get a positive recommendation from the committee and if you will confirmation from the full senate next week. back with more bill press after the break. stay with us. alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with so
of foreign policy for the coming year. conor, thank you so much. we'll see you soon. bill: there are thousands heading to the national mall in washington. it is called the largest human rights demonstration in the world. we are live to tell you what that's all about in just minutes. martha: and missing, now, in iran, they do not know where this american pastor who is being held in iran is. his family now can't find hill. they visit him every week and now he is gone. big questions. we will speak to his wife after this. twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. that's a good thing, but
is an expert when it comes to foreign policy and international affairs. he broke some eggs over there in those particular institutions. so he's no pushover, but i think the most important thing here is exactly what you noticed. and that is that relationship. we are starting the second term of the obama administration, believe it or not, time is short before people begin to turn to the future. right now, yes, the president is working for the country, et cetera, et cetera, but this is also about legacy. i think this is a legacy chief of staff pick. this is somebody who has been with him from the -- been with the president from the beginning of his federal office days, when he was a senator-elect, first met, et cetera. so he's been there from the beginning. he has the president's back. the president understands that. this is someone i think the president is entrusting, not just with the staff at the white house and all the things that come with that chief of staff role, but also with the obama era as it will, at some point the obama era will be written up and so much of what -- we can tell from t
and nuclear test. let's bring in our expert now of foreign defense policy at the american enterprise institute. michael, let's just go here. so is kim jong-un, if he is trying to prove that he is not afraid of the big bad wolf, that being the u.s. or is this another attention grabber? what is it that he wants from the united states? take any money, because it's not going to get it. >> yesterday shown that he is not afraid by launching his missile in december. and also china before that back in april. i'm not so sure why north korea is upset about this. it's empty and it doesn't do anything but previous extender thing. there is no reason to do so. they are not doing anything about the north korean provocations. >> this guy has to raise his own head and try to get some attentions. let's talk about the people that might be watching. japan is right there and we are talking about proximity. we are talking about how much attention they can get. they are hoping for a response. then there is china who is north korea's major ally in terms of diplomacy. but china is now saying that kim jong-un is backin
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)

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